Can You Build Your Social Capital Through Social Media?

Photo: Google Image

Photo: Google Image

Social media is not just an activity; it is an investment of valuable time and resources. Surround yourself with people who not just support you and stay with you, but inform your thinking about ways to WOW your online presence”  Sean Gardner (@2morrowknight)

In a blogpost written by the World Bank titled Does Social Media Create (or Destroy) Social Capital?, the writer stated that:

Elusive to define, social capital consists of those bonds created by belonging to a group that instils trust, solidarity, and cooperation among members. We know that good social capital has an enormous development potential, positively influencing economic growth, democracy, cognitive development, and adoption of farming practices, among others.

Just as a person can lose his/her social capital through high crime rate and dishonesty, that is the same way a person can either positively or negatively build his/her social capital through social media, The most important tool used in measuring a person’s social capital on social media is the quality of content a person shares with his/her audience online.

With the recent high internet penetration, people, companies and organisations have come to trust the judgement of the citizens from the online world. One needs to be very critical when sharing information online. People trust and heed to who share relevant information on the various social media platforms. The youth should take advantage of this and create a network of great influencers on social media. In this age, how you are worth on social media platforms can manifest in physical wealth. Watch what you post on your timeline. Ask yourself, is this worth sharing? If not, please do not!

If there is anything that has helped me to get connected to some great people in this world then it is through social media, I am very much concern about what I share on my timeline. I am connected to such great people because they have come to trust my content and see it as relevant. I have never met some of these people face-to-face, but through social media we are bonded!

In an email I sent to Jeffrey Manu, who is a Jesus-Believer, Brand Strategist, Author, Entrepreneur and Co-founder of Lightcreative Ghana, I asked Jeffery if a person could use social media to build his/her Social Capital and how is this possible? He shares his thoughts below:

“Social media builds social capital by relaying the value of a brand. It could be a person, organization or nation. Social media gives both storytellers and consumers the opportunity to give relevant information and build trust amongst their audience. The communication of value is what sets those doing it right from the rest.”

The value of your communication makes a person to decide to follow you or send  a friend request you. This help you create a social media network for yourself.  To confirm this, I asked Derrick N. Ashong, who has over 14000 followers on twitter, the need to build your social capital through social media.

“I believe a person can build their personal brand via social media. Ultimately social capital is all about perceived value. Social media enables individuals & organisations to build social capital by creating & sharing compelling content. The more compelling, the greater the impact. The challenge is to maintain & cultivate a relationship with your social media networks over time.”

Some tips to note:

  • Becareful of the profile picture you upload. Let it be more decent.
  • Share relevant information on your timeline.
  • Upload decent pictures in your photos  in your online album.
  • Contribute and share your views on trending issues.
  • Do not use abusive words on social media.
  • Do not respond to abusive comments from people with abusive words.

Top Agricultural blog? Submit your blog and win up to 3000 Euros!

Blogging Offer

Blogging Offer

The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA), in collaboration with FARAYam-PukriCAFANAYFANAFESPC/PAFPNET ande-Agriculture is pleased to launch the 2nd Edition of the Youth in Agriculture Blog Competition (YoBloCo Awards).

This contest is organised in the framework of the ARDYIS project, which aims to raise youth awareness and improve their capacity on agricultural and rural development issues in ACP countries using Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs).

The aims of this blog competition are to:

  • Put into limelight issues, successes and challenges faced by youth engaged in: agriculture in urban and rural areas;
  • Encourage the production of information and the use of new information and communication technologies by young farmers’ groups and organisations interested in the “youth in agriculture” question;
  • Promote the sharing of information on the issues of agriculture and rural development in African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries.

1. Who can participate?

The YoBloCo Awards are open in two categories:

a. Individual category

This category is open to students in agricultural training courses, young farmers, journalists or other young people interested in ICT or agriculture.

b. Institutional category

This category is open to local or national

  • young farmers’ organisations;
  • young members of farmers’ organisations;
  • young members of any organisation interested in agriculture, rural development and ICT.

For this competition, an organisation is understood as any type of non-profit or for-profit association, cooperative, forum, network or related grouping, excluding government institutions. Organisations that receive funding from governments but are not formal governmental institutions can be eligible if they fulfil all criteria.

If the organisation or grouping submitting an entry is not officially registered in the country, it should be recommended, via a letter of recommendation, by a national partner organisation, which is officially registered.

When young members of an organisation are submitting an entry in the “Institutional category”, they should apply on behalf of their organisation. If the entry wins an award, it is the organisation, which will be declared winner and will receive the cash prize. The blog creator or a representative of blog creators (if it is a team) will be invited for the prize giving ceremony and receive a trophy on behalf of the winning organisation. When a team applies on behalf of their organisation, the person representing the team must be specified in the application process. The cash prize won would be sent to the organisation.

For both categories, the young people participating must be between 18 to 35 years old (by the time of submission) and be nationals of ACP countries signatories of the Cotonou Agreement (see Note 1 below).

2. How to participate?

Individuals or organisations who wish to submit a blog and take part in the competition will have about 4 months to prepare or update their blogs with content related to agriculture (see Section 3 below). Blogs and all required information/documents will be submitted via an online form between December and January 2014 (the link to the blog submission form will be provided on this page as from 2 December 2013).

Prior to the blog submission, all people/organisation interested to be updated regularly on the competition can subscribe on this link: http://eepurl.com/GAJA9

3. Content of eligible blogs

The blog submitted can be a newly created one, or an existing one but which has been recently updated with content related to agriculture. However, mainly blog posts from the commencement of the competition will be judged.

A blog that deals with, or contains posts/articles on subjects other than agriculture must include, consistently (see Note 3 below), new articles related to agriculture, in order to be considered eligible.

In the context of the YoBloCo Awards, “new articles” or “new posts” refer to texts published between the launch of competition until its closure (please check section 7 below for the deadline). Posts/articles considered for the competition must be in French or English and can be related to one or several ACP countries.

Articles on the blog should cover themes or issues such as:

  • Challenges, success and issues faced by Youth in agriculture and related activities;
  • Climate change, environmental conservation, natural resource management;
  • Agri-business (marketing, commercialization, processing, etc.);
  • Agricultural production and Food security;
  • Agriculture value chains and agricultural policy;
  • Actions, policies and strategies related to youth involvement in agriculture;
  • ICT use in the agricultural sector (how can ICTs promote agriculture or how can ICT support innovation in agricultural value chains, ICT and agriculture policies, ICT and extension services etc.);
  • How are ICTs improving (or can improve) youth opportunities in rural areas;
  • Agro-tourism;
  • Contribution of Diaspora in ACP Agriculture;
  • The role and importance of Family Farming and Smallholder Farming in alleviating hunger and poverty, providing food security and nutrition, improving livelihoods, managing natural resources, protecting the environment, and achieving sustainable development, in particular in rural areas. (see Note 4 below);
  • Any other agriculture related theme or issue.

4. Selection process

There are two different processes for the two blog categories.

a) Individual Category

The eligible individual blogs submitted will first go through a public evaluation process, whereby the online audience will vote for, and comment on the blog that they like the most. Following the public evaluation, 15 finalists will be selected based on the number of votes they will receive, and they will finally be evaluated by an independent jury composed of expert in the field of ICTs and Agriculture. The first prize for this category is 1500 Euros and other prizes will be awarded!

b) Institutional Category

Blogs in the institutional category will also go through the public evaluation process, whereby the online audience will be required to leave comments on the blogs that they like the most (there is no limit on the number of blogs to comment). The jury will then choose the best blogs per region for this category and will take into account comments made by the public. The prize for this category is 3,000 Euros per winning organisation. In addition, some of the most appreciated blogs by the public may receive special rewards from organisers if the jury does not select them.

Updates on the whole voting process and results will be shared regularly on theYoBloCo Blog and entrants who are subscribed and submitted a blog will also be informed by email.

Votes and comments on blogs will end in March, 2014.

5. Selection criteria

The main selection criteria are the following:

  • Quality of language in posts
  • Originality of posts/articles (most posts should be written by the entrant)
  • Quality of analysis in the posts
  • Frequency/Consistency of blogging
  • Animation of the blog
  • Presence of agriculture related content (especially since the launch of the contest for existing blogs)
  • Overall technical quality of the blog

For the institutional category, additional criteria are:

  • Presence of information on the organisation’s activities
  • Presence of information in youth in agriculture issues

6. Prizes

A. Individual category

  • 1st Prize:  1,500 Euros
  • 2nd Prize: 1,000 Euros
  • 3rd Prize: 800 Euros

B. Institutional category

  • 3000 Euros per region (West Africa, Central Africa, Southern Africa, East Africa, Caribbean and Pacific)

C. Special Prizes

  • Best female blogger: 1000 Euros (only individual blogs will be eligible for this prize)
  • Best blog on Family Farming (see Note 4 below): 1000 Euros (an individual or institutional blog may be eligible for this prize)
  • Best blogs with business potential: at least two blogs will be selected, out of the best finalist individual blogs selected by the public, to receive mentorship and incubation opportunities  (See Note 5 below)

D. Runners-up

  • A number of runners-up in will receive a certificate of participation

Winning blogs and other best blogs will be promoted by CTA and its partners’ various channels.  In addition, authors of winning blog or other best blogs will have the opportunity to be involved in future activities of CTA or its partners.

7. Deadline and key dates

Launch of the competition: 8 October 2013

Submission of Blogs: 2 December 2013 – 31 January 2014

Online Evaluation (public): February – March 2014

Jury Evaluation: April – May 2014

Winners Announced: June 2014

The date of the prize giving ceremony will be announced subsequently.

8. Additional terms and rules

a. Winners of the 1st Edition of the YoBloCo awards (3 winners from individual category and 3 winners from institutional category) are not eligible to submit their blog again for the competition. However, best entrants who did not receive a prize for the 1st Edition of the YoBloCo Awards can submit their blog for this new Edition.

b. The organisers reserve the right to reject any application that does not meet the contest criteria and the present regulations.

c. Participation in the competition implies an explicit agreement given to the CTA to make public, as needed, the experiences described, as well as participant’s identity. Moreover, it constitutes an agreement given to the CTA to use the experiences described in its publications and for promotional activities.

d. CTA will not return to the participants documents submitted.

e. By entering, participants warrant that content on the blog does not infringe on any third party’s rights.

f. All local taxes on prizes, if required, are the sole responsibility of the winners.

g. If, for any reason, the contest cannot be conducted as planned, the CTA reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to cancel, close, change, or suspend it.

h. Youths directly working for CTA or ARDYIS advisory Committee organisations are not eligible to participate. However young people working for partners of these organisations are eligible.

i. Applicants will be informed about the competition results by email to the addresses provided in the blog submission form.

j. Apart from the public result announcement, each winner will be notified through the e-mail address he/she provided. A reminder will be sent if necessary. In case of non response to the reminder message and 10 days maximum after the result announcement, the next best candidate in the same category will be declared winner;

k. Decisions taken by the jury and the CTA are final and are beyond dispute;

l. All contest participants implicitly accept the rules presented in this document.

9. Notes

Note 1: The ACP countries targeted here are those that have signed the ACP-EU Cotonou Agreement : Angola – Antigua and Barbuda – Belize – Cape Verde – Comoros – Bahamas – Barbados – Benin – Botswana – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cameroon – Chad –  Central African Republic – Congo (Brazzaville) – Congo (Kinshasa) – Cook Islands – Côte d’Ivoire – Cuba – Djibouti – Dominican Republic – Dominica – East Timor – Equatorial Guinea – Eritrea – Ethiopia – Fiji – Gabon – The Gambia – Ghana – Grenada –Guinea – Guinea-Bissau  – Guyana – Haiti – Jamaica – Kenya – Kiribati – Lesotho – Liberia – Madagascar – Malawi – Mali – Marshall Islands – Mauritius – Mauritania – Federated States of Micronesia – Mozambique – Namibia – Nauru – Niger – Nigeria – Niue – Uganda – Palau – Papua New Guinea – Rwanda – Saint Christopher and Nevis – Saint Vincent and Grenadines – Saint Lucia – Solomon Islands – Samoa – São Tomé and Principe – Senegal – Seychelles – Sierra Leone – Somalia – South Africa – Sudan – Suriname – Swaziland – Tanzania – Togo – Tonga – Trinidad and Tobago – Tuvalu – Vanuatu – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Note 2: The main elements that will be evaluated are the blog animation and content.

Note 3: To be evaluated by selection committees.

Note 4: This theme is designed directly along the core theme of the United Nations2014 International Year of Family Farming (IYFF).

Note 5: For the special prizes for the best blogs with business potential, the jury may contact potential winners for more details on their projects. Mentorship opportunities will include advice for the finalization of the blogs, capacity building opportunity, etc.

10. More information and contact:

The purpose of the ARDYIS (Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society) project is to raise youth awareness and improve their capacity on agricultural and rural development issues in ACP countries using ICTs. The Advisory Committee for the project is made of the following institutions: Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa (FARA), African Network for Agriculture, Agroforestry and Natural Resources Education (ANAFE), Pacific Agriculture and Forestry Policy Network (PAFPNet), Caribbean farmers’ Network (CAFAN), Yam-Pukri association, African Youth Foundation (AYF). ARDYIS activities will contribute to the promotion of opportunities for youth in ACP countries in the agricultural, rural development and ICT sectors.

For the 1st Edition of the YoBloCo Awards, 92 blog submissions from 25 ACP countriesand about 3,000 people from ACP and non ACP regions contributing to the public evaluation of the blogs. 6 blogs (3 individual blogs and 3 institutional blogs) were awarded.  Best entrants in both categories were invited to attend the IAALD Africa Chapter Conference and prize giving ceremony of the YoBloCo Awards, held in Johannesburg, South Africa, from 21-23 May 2012.

Contact

Feel free to contact us if you have any question or if you want to join the ARDYIS project discussion list to exchange/receive information about youth, ICT and agriculture.

SOURCE:
ARDYIS project/ICT4D Programme
Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA)
Email : ardyis-project@cta.int
Telephone: +31 (0)317 467 100
The Netherla

The Essence of Personal Branding in the Social Media Era

The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding

The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding

 

Does personal branding really matter? This is it: whether you are a job seeker or entrepreneur, your personal brand and online presence has immense effect on you. A recent survey by Jobvite stated that more and more recruiters are turning to social media to aid them in their job recruitment, and that an individual’s online presence is one great determinant for securing a job.

“Candidates best watch what they put on their social profiles, as an overwhelming majority of recruiters form negative opinions from posts flaunting drugs, alcohol, and profanity—and 42% of recruiters have apparently reconsidered an applicant (either positively or negatively) based on what a social profile revealed.” ~ Jobvite

The shocking revelations, confirms lots of the point and concerns raised in the book. The simple guide helps readers, to use the Four D’s (4 D’s) and Four P’s (4 P’s) to build their personal brand. Let’s take a quick overview:

 

DiscoveryPersonal Discovery ~ Purpose.

Development – Working on your talents ~ Preparation.

DesignPlatform building, Career and work life ~ Positioning

DeploymentService and execution ~ Publicity, Promotion

The goal is to build a brand base on authenticity, value creation and service. Here again, according to the bayt.com report, about 9 out of 10 search for people’s profiles online after they have applied for a job or about to meet in person either for business or the activities. It’s proves that personal branding and having an online presence is really important in this age, and that it can either work for or against you. From the report it stated that, “In fact, even something as simple as a photograph could influence decision-makers, with eight in 10 (79.6%) respondents of the belief that their online photo effects how they are perceived.” The crust of the matter is that these polls were not conducted anywhere than East and North Africa. It’s now time to take your personal brand seriously. Don’t be left out.

This is what an international Best seller had to say concerning the book:

“With the speed of changes in the world today, success has no geographical borders. In this engaging book, Bernard Kelvin Clive shares principles from his own success in Ghana that can inspire and guide readers anywhere in the world. With a gentle and humble spirit, he reminds us that building a name for ourselves is most easily done not by manipulating and pushing but simply by serving others. I highly recommend The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding for anyone who has a voice to be heard.” Dan Miller, author of New York Times bestselling 48 Days to the Work You Love.

Remember: It’s time to make your career and brand count. “#SocialMedia can get you the attention you want but not the trust you need. You got to build trust. #PersonalBranding” ~ If you are interested in learning how to position yourself properly online, a copy of the book “The No Nonsense Guide to personal Branding for Career Success”

Your brand matters.

Author: Bernard Kelvin Clive | Amazon Bestelling Author | #1 Self-Help Podcast Host in Ghana

Clean Team Ghana Nominated for GUBA Awards 2013.

 

Clean Team Ghana

Clean Team Ghana

Clean Team Ghana is announced as one of the finalists in the Business and Enterprise (Sustainable Business Award) category, of the 4th annual Ghana UK Based Achievement (GUBA) Awards 2013. GUBA unveiled all nominees at its press launch at the House of Commons, 5th September, presided by MP Diane Abbott.

GUBA is a non-profit awards event, which celebrates exceptional achievement, talent and ability in the British Ghanaian community and, also, of valuable services provided to Ghanaians in the UK or Ghana. As well as proudly celebrating its rich culture and traditions, GUBA also provides a platform that showcases successes from within the Ghanaian Diaspora across the fields of business and commerce, health, sport and entertainment.

GUBA 2013 nominees include scene stealers like music artists Tinchy Stryder and Sway and Kanya King, the founder and CEO of Music of Black Origin (MOBO) awards.

Andy Narracott, CEO of Clean Team Ghana said “We are very excited that our work has been recognised and for being nominated alongside such inspiring companies. Our aim is to offer a convenient and affordable sanitation solution to the urban poor. Our customers received a branded, portable toilet when they sign up to a monthly payment plan. Our staff collect the waste on average 3 times a week and dispose of it safely, where it can be converted into valuable resources such as fertilizer and energy. We recognise that safe and adequate sanitation is vital to a healthy society but also believe people should be given the opportunity to improve their own lives as customers, rather than as the beneficiaries of charity”.

“Starting from a small pilot of 20 families in 2011, we are currently serving over 400 families in Kumasi, Ghana, with the aim of serving over 10,000 by 2015. We have been able to achieve this with the help of our generous funders and our dedicated and committed staff who work hard to deliver an unrivalled service. We are also set on redefining the social stigma of the night soil collector. Our resource collectors exemplify that Clean Team services can be an honourable job and a service to one’s community.”

“We draw our greatest motivation from the joy and the satisfaction of the various families we serve. Our service focuses on helping people to provide for their loved ones, not simply themselves. We believe that with a safe, accessible, reliable and affordable sanitation, life is better. Our mission is to make sanitation easy and affordable, helping the millions of people across the world without a safe and dignified place to go.”

Visit here for some photos on Clean Team http://www.flickr.com/photos/cleanteamghana/sets/72157635917184046/

To vote for Clean Team Ghana, please visit http://www.gubaawards.co.uk/sustainable-business/

For Further Information

For more information about Clean Team, please visit www.cleanteamtoilets.com or email Andy Narracott on info@cleanteamtoilets.com. For more information about the event please contact George Ameyaw george@gubaawards.co.uk +44 (0)7956 945360. For a description of all of GUBA 2013 nominees please visit www.gubaawards.co.uk/voting. For tickets to the awards ceremony please visit www.gubaawards.co.uk/tickets

3 LESSONS I LEARNT FROM MY 3 BUDDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY.

Its 12:10am local time in Ghana. I am still awake reflecting on the moments I had in the university with my THREE friends. The hustle and struggle we had to pass through to even get graduated “unofficially” (waiting for actual graduation in mid-September, 2013) at the university. One thing that kept me going is the friends I had at the university and how these guys motivated me to stay focused and live a balanced life. Let me briefly share with you THREE lessons I learnt from my good THREE friends, I call them coaches.

 

Frank Kweku Bandoh

Frank Kweku Bandoh

Frank Kweku Bandoh was my schoolmate at the high school and sat with him in the same class during high school moments. Abeiku (a Ghanaian name for males born on Wednesday) as we normally call him started his small and phone repairing business right from high school. We use to call him “businessman. At the university we became very good friends in sharing ideas and how to execute them. He advanced from phone repairing phones to printing and stationery business where he employed someone to take care of it. He later bought a car and used it as a taxi and generated enough to buy his current car which he is using as a taxi (cab). I used to ask him a lot of questions as to how he was able to start all these small businesses at his age. He will never respond to any of my questions and will tell me to start something. I took his advice and started a small business on campus with him where we use to sell liquid bathing soap to students. That is when I learnt a lot from him. If there is one thing I learnt from this guy, it will be his ability to create a business concept out of anything he comes into contact with.

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Richmond Elipklim

Richmond Elipklim is the fashionista among the three friends. As much as he is interested in stock exchange and anything related to investment, he is so particular about what we wear and how we wear them. Richmond would occasionally buy clothing that he thinks is good for us to wear to meet the current fashion standard. He used to say “Kofi, what you are wearing is too big, you need to change it”. He made us so conscious of what we we should wear to the extent that, I needed to consult him before buying any shoe or clothing. Trust Richmond to dress well for any occasion, you will easily notice his presence with his gentle style of dressing. I learnt to spend money on what is important and not just anything. I have become so conscious of my dressing up till now. He taught me that, dressing speaks a lot about your self image and that one can create a personal brand through the way he/she dresses. He is was also my schoolmate at high school and sat in the same class with him.

Bismark with his guitar.

Bismark with his guitar.

Bismark Hayford is the gentle man among the three friends. We call him “Pastor Bismark”, he is fast to draw us back to God when we seem to be veering of the path of our relationship with God. He is a lover of music and he unconsciously taught me how to sing and trained my voice as well. Bismark is the quiet person among us, kind of an introvert. His enormous ability to absorb our craziness is one spectacular principle I learnt from him. He is a good listener and extremely patient, he does not respond to situations as fast as we would but will gently think through before he takes an action.

I learnt from him how to be patient and hold on tight to my dreams and ambitions even though I might not see any sign of it actualising.

 

 

 

We use to discuss how we can escape this unproductive educational system in Ghana and what to make use of our leisure time. We would share ideas ranging from marriage to career during our meet-ups. Our time in the evenings were mostly based on business ideas. Thank you guys for impacting my life, I owe your kids a lot.

“SUCCESS IN 9 TWEETS BY DERRICK ASHONG”

Donald Ward, President of iROKKO CONCEPTS tweeted on his timeline asking his followers to name one Young African Entrepreneur they would like to meet and If they do meet that person, what question would you ask?

I responded to the tweet and said that I would like to meet Derrick Ashong:

photo credit: Ridwan Adami for Ridz Design

photo credit: Ridwan Adami for Ridz Design

 

 

Derrick Ashong is An experienced musician, broadcaster and digital media influencer, he has carved out a unique niche as an expert in bridging the gap between old and new media. He has been invited to speak & perform at prestigious institutions including Harvard Business School, Wharton, MIT & Stanford, and has hosted and moderated events for influencers and heads of state including Nobel Laureates Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, as well as Gilberto Gil, Ted Turner, Tommy Hilfiger, Bob Geldof, Queen Rania of Jordan, and former President Bill Clinton at the Club de Madrid. His interviews have ranged from celebrities like John Legend, Jimmi Cliff and supermodel Alek Wek, to environmentalist Jane Goodall, senior advisor to President Obama David Axelrod, Governor Jeb Bush and former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

 

In response to my tweet, Derrick pointed out nine key principles that guides his life. Enjoy the tweets.

Thank you for reading this post send me your comments through emeritus2011@gmail.com.

“THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR YOUNG AFRICAN ENTREPRENEURS” – THE $75,000 ANZISHA PRIZE ANNOUNCES ITS 2013 FINALISTS.

ALA

DUBBED “THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR YOUNG AFRICAN ENTREPRENEURS” – THE $75,000 ANZISHA PRIZE ANNOUNCES ITS 2013 FINALISTS

Twelve inspirational entrepreneurs from around Africa are the finalists for the prestigious Anzisha Prize, Africa’s foremost youth entrepreneurship award. The contenders, who hail from 10 countries on the continent, stand a chance to share in over $75 000 USD in cash prizes and receive networking and learning opportunities, which is provided through a partnership between African Leadership Academy and by The MasterCard Foundation.

The Anzisha Prize identifies and celebrates Africa’s young entrepreneurial leaders between the ages of 15 to 22, who have addressed challenges in their communities and launched innovative ventures. This year these range from renewable energy projects and technology solutions to agriculture and education.

For the first time in the prize’s history, South Africa has two finalists. Kolawole Olajide, 21, is the chief developer and co-founder of Funda, an award-winning online learning management system. Neftaly Malatjie, 22, has been running Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP) for more than eight years since he founded it at the age of 14. DYP is an NGO that focuses on income generating programmes that enable young people to engage in business opportunities.

Uganda also boasts two finalists. Best Ayiorworth, 19, has empowered over 200 young women in her home district through her microfinance lending programme while Titus Mawano’s vision to get African SMMEs “in the cloud” inspired him to develop Ffene, a business management platform.

Says Chi Achebe, Anzisha Prize programme manager: “There are thousands of entrepreneurial African youth who are making a difference in their communities every day. We are honoured to be able to share a subset of their stories with the world and enable them to take their businesses to the next level.  These are the African business leaders of the future and our goal is to help support their growth.”

“The Anzisha Prize illustrates the potential, ingenuity and entrepreneurial energy of young people across Africa,” said Reeta Roy, President and CEO of The MasterCard Foundation. “Each year, the Anzisha Prize finalists encourage young people from across the continent to pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions and make a difference in their communities.”

All 12 finalists will take part in the 2013 Anzisha Prize Finalist Week which takes place from Sunday, August 25, to Friday, August 30. While there, they will be taught by the African Leadership Academy’s renowned Entrepreneurial Leadership faculty as well as members of the South African Chapter of Entrepreneurs Organisation.

The grand prize winner will be announced at a gala function to be held in Johannesburg, South Africa, on the evening of August 30. . As part of the MasterCard Foundation’s partnership with African Leadership Academ (ALA),  winners will share $75,000 USD courtesy of The MasterCard Foundation and will join the esteemed Anzisha Fellows network, composed of the 20 Anzisha Fellows to date. The winners will also be given networking and learning opportunities to take their projects to the next level.

Now in its third year, the Anzisha Prize, celebrates the initiative and innovation of youth in Africa. It identifies exceptional young entrepreneurs who are leading by example and underscores their ability to significantly shape the future of Africa.

The word ‘Anzisha’ is taken from Swahili and translates into ‘initiative’ and is a project that is gaining significant momentum in African business circles as its impact is beginning to be felt.

The 12 Anzisha 2013 finalists (in country order) are:

CAMEROON

David Morfaw

Project Title: Poult-Vault Inc.

Industry: Agriculture

Nineteen-year-old David Morfaw, from Bafut in Cameroon, has always had an entrepreneurial spirit and started his first business at the age of eight. His current venture is the poultry business Poult-Vault Inc. However, it is not simply about the bottom line but also helping the community he lives in – he currently employs six people. His business plan maximises each opportunity, whether it is selling chicks after three weeks, keeping them until they are grown at nine weeks or selling the chickens and their eggs. He also provides the waste produced to local farmers for fertile manure.

EGYPT

Khaled Shady

Project Title: Mubser

Industry: Information technology

Khaled Shady, from Shebin El-Kom, is a 21-year-old computer engineering student at Menoufoia University in Egypt. His university curriculum and technical knowledge gave him a unique opportunity to develop a system that could make a difference for the blind community. He decided to develop a cutting-edge product that could aid them in their daily lives. Shady’s invention Mubser is a wearable belt, fully equipped with Bluetooth and Microsoft Kinect, which allows the wearer to navigate safely around objects and obstacles using a system of vibrating motors. It is already making an impact and improving the quality of life for blind people.

KENYA

Barclay Okari

Project Title: Safi-pads

Industry: Consumer products

Paul Barclay is a 21-year-old entrepreneur from Kitale in Kenya. His business, Safi-pads, provides inexpensive, reusable and washable sanitary towels for women and young girls. Barclay saw that the prices of regular disposable towels were simply too expensive for families strapped for cash so he and his team developed a product that could help thousands of women while still turning a profit. Barclay has already sold more than 14 000 units of his sanitary towels and plans to expand when he can afford to pay for various mechanisms to make his production system more efficient. He currently employs 14 women but impacts so many families by providing an affordable option of a necessary hygiene product.

MALAWI

Gonjetso Chinyama

Project Title: Pakwathu

Industry: Information technology

Gonjetso Chinyama is a 21-year-old student at the University of Malawi in Blantyre where he is studying Management Information Systems with a passion for art, design, and computer programming. He joined these passions to start a creative design agency called Twenty2 Creative. From there he saw a niche in the marketplace and created the Internet real estate venture, Pakwathu. This online classifieds website enables Malawians to find property throughout the country and sift through a plethora of options based on location and price.

NIGERIA

Temitayo Olufuwa

Project Title: JobsinNigeria

Industry: Information technology

Temitayo Olufuwa, from Fadeyi, is a graduate of N.I.I.T. where he focused on computer science and software. The 21-year-old created JobsinNigeria (www.jobsinnigeria.com.ng), a web-based system that allows users to search, find and apply for new jobs at the click of the mouse or even on mobile devices. JobsinNigeria only started in 2012 and yet its impact on the Nigerian community is growing substantially with more than 200 Nigerians already finding jobs.

RWANDA

Joie Laurent Sangwa

Project Title: Domestic Biogas Use Promotion Project

Industry: Energy and waste

Nineteen-year-old Joie Sangwa from Burera in Rwanda realised that her community needed cheap and renewable energy resources. Working with a team, she discovered that human waste is a good source of energy and worked to install domestic biogas units throughout her home region. This offers a cheap, alternative energy source while helping with the environment.

SENEGAL

Donald Bambara

Project Title: Green Act

Industry: Energy and waste

Nineteen-year-old Donald Bambara grew up in Burkina Faso but after completing his high school education, moved to Dakar, Senegal, to start international management studies. Bambara quickly came to recognise a big problem in his university community – waste. He came up with a dynamic plan for how to combat the waste problem and started Green Act. This project helps separate trash from recyclable materials on campus. But his quest to clean up his campus, and campuses around him, doesn’t end there as he processes the recyclables into plastic pellets, funds cleaning services on campuses, and tries to educate students and young people in Senegal about the impact of current waste management practices and future possibilities for recycling.

SOUTH AFRICA

Neftaly Malatjie

Project Title: Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP)

Industry: Youth development and education

Neftaly Malatjie has a passion for social entrepreneurship and a track record of commitment to community work. Since the age of 11, he has worked as a preschool teacher, peer educator, library assistant, HIV/Aids counsellor, drugs awareness and prevention teacher, learning and development advisor and afternoon care coordinator. In 2005, at the age of 14, using cash he had saved from his part-time job, he started Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP) to make an impact in the poverty stricken Diepsloot area. Diepsloot Youth Projects focuses on income generating programmes that enable young people to engage in business opportunities. It has created employment for 16 young people.

Kolawole Olajide

Project Title: Funda

Industry: Information technology and education

Kolawole Olajide, 21, is a native of Nigeria and schooled in Cape Town, South Africa. He is the chief developer and co-founder of Funda, an online learning management system that brings together educational resources to make the lives of teachers, students and parents easier. For example, a teacher can create a website that serves as an online discussion board for students to collaborate on an assignment while students can create a class website to work on and submit assignments electronically. He is part of a five man team of young entrepreneurs who represent five different African nations – Nigeria, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Kenya.  Olajide and his team have gone on to win a number of awards, recognition from prestigious groups like the UNDP and an invitation to attend the Davos World Economic Forum.

TANZANIA

Damotila Silayo 

Project Title: Jathropa Soap Production

Industry: Health and wellness

Domitila Silayo is a 21-year-old university student from Moshi, Tanzania. After visiting an agricultural festival, Silayo saw great potential for using the jathropa plant for cosmetic and medicinal uses. She began research on how to produce a soap made from the herbal plant that could heal a variety of skin problems including ringworm and dandruff. Jathropa Soap Production has gone on to help thousands of people in Tanzania fight off skin problems while still turning a healthy profit and creating employment.

UGANDA

Best Aiyorworth

Project Title: Girls’ Power Micro Lending Organisation

Industry: Microfinance and education

Best Aiyorworth is an advocate for education in her home district Nebbi in northern Uganda. The 21-year-old has started the Girls’ Power Micro Lending Organisation. Its motto is “To help a mother, is to help a girl child.” Girls’ Power is a micro lending business that supports girls through their mothers. They give women starting capital or money to boost their existing businesses so that they are able to support their daughters with school fees and scholastic materials and ensure that they get an education. She has empowered over 400 women to date.

Titus Mawano

Project Title: Ffene

Industry: Information technology

Titus Mawano, a 22-year-old from Kampala, is the brains behind Ffene, a business management platform for SMMEs in Africa who are struggling to stay organised, yet still use a loose-leaf notebook to keep record of clients and sales. Ffene’s vision is to get African businesses in the cloud. Whether it is accounting, inventory management or data keeping, Ffene is the one stop shop for a SMME’s accounting, customer and inventory management needs. With more than 400 current customers just three months after launch, Ffene is well on its way to revolutionising how SMMEs do business in Uganda and beyond.

Go to:

➢ Website: www.anzishaprize.org

➢ Facebook: www.facebook.com/anzishaprize

➢ Twitter: @anzishaprize

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

Addendum

 

South Africa’s Neftaly Malatjie was not originally listed when Anzisha announced its shortlist of 25 candidates. However, Malatjie replaced one of the semi-finalists who did not meet the awards’ criteria during the diligence process.

About the Anzisha Prize

 

The Anzisha Prize is managed out of African Leadership Academy’s Centre for Entrepreneurial Leadership, which was established through a multi-year partnership with The MasterCard Foundation. Through the Anzisha Prize, the organisers seek to catalyse innovation and entrepreneurship among youth across the continent.

About African Leadership Academy

 

African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to transform Africa by developing a powerful network of entrepreneurial leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact. Each year, ALA brings together the most promising young leaders from all 54 African nations for a pre-university program in South Africa with a focus on leadership, entrepreneurship and African studies. ALA continues to cultivate these leaders throughout their lives, in university and beyond, by providing on-going leadership and entrepreneurial training and connecting them to high-impact networks of people and capital that can catalyse large-scale change. For more information, visit http://africanleadershipacademy.org.

About The MasterCard Foundation

The MasterCard Foundation is an independent, global organization based in Toronto, Canada, with more than $6 billion in assets.  Through collaboration with partner organizations in 50 countries, it is creating opportunities for all people to learn and prosper.  The Foundation’s programs promote Financial Inclusion and advance Youth Learning, mostly in Africa.  Established in 2006 through the generosity of MasterCard Worldwide when it became a public company, the Foundation is separate and independent from the company.  Its policies, operations, and funding decisions are determined by its own Foundation Board of Directors and President and CEO.  To learn more about the Foundation, please visit www.mastercardfdn.org.

Press Contact:

Janine Walker janine.w@mweb.co.za or +27 83 600 9753

Faith Abiodun fabiodun@africanleadershipacademy.org or +27 78 644 2649

 

Should you write an article using this press release, African Leadership Academy would like to link to the article on its website. Please email any articles to janine.w@mweb.co.za and info@africanleadershipacademy.org

AFRICAN LEADERSHIP ACADEMY ANNOUNCES INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY ESSAY COMPETITION.

 

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African Leadership Academy (ALA) is very delighted to join the United Nations in recognizing the immense potential and celebrating the extraordinary achievements of young people around the world on International Youth Day, August 12, 2013.

International Youth Day (IYD), celebrated yearly on August 12, is a United Nations-designated day of observance established in 2000 to raise awareness of issues affecting young people around the world. It is also a day to recognize the efforts of the world’s youth in creating a global society, and aims to promote ways to engage them in being more actively involved in making positive contributions to their communities. The theme for International Youth Day 2013 is “Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward”

African Leadership Academy (ALA) is a leading pan-African institution that seeks to transform Africa by identifying, developing and connecting a powerful network of leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact on the continent. ALA believes that Africa will be developed by Africans, and in line with the theme for IYD 2013, promotes the retention of African talent in Africa, as well as the return of African talent to the continent from the diaspora.

In celebrating International Youth Day 2013, ALA focuses on the need to maximize the potential of African youth at home and abroad to contribute optimally to the development of the continent. Demographic studies show that Africa has the largest youth population in the world of over 200 million people, a figure which is expected to double by 2045.

The UN Economic Commission for Africa estimates that by 2015, over one-fourth of the world’s workforce will be African; conversely the huge vacuum of opportunities for the African youth makes the gainful employment of this young workforce extremely doubtful. In spite of the fact that six of the ten fastest growing economies in the world are in sub-Saharan Africa, unemployment rates across the continent hover around 70%, and the World Bank estimates that about 60% of all unemployed Africans are between the ages of 15 and 24. It is clearly evident therefore, that Africa’s great challenge is how to effectively utilize its youth bulge to drive the continent’s development.

Over time, the allure of securing quality education and improved economic opportunities has led to a prolonged exodus of many young Africans from the continent, resulting in an erroneous belief that the best opportunities in life are outside Africa. However, the vast majority of the African youth reside in the continent, and engage in endless pursuits of economic opportunities. There is an urgent need for concerted efforts by governments, businesses, non-profits and all Africans to create an enabling environment for the African youth to gain access to the resources, skills and networks that will enable them to contribute effectively to African development.

As part of ALA’s ongoing efforts to actively engage the African youth in the development of the continent, the Academy hereby announces the first edition of the International Youth Day Essay Writing Competition open to young Africans between the ages of 15-19 years. Between August 12 and September 12, 2013, young Africans are challenged to write on the topic: “How can governments, businesses, non-profits, individuals and the youth collaborate to maximize Africa’s youth potential for the continent’s development and prosperity?” The writers of the best three essays will be awarded scholarships to attend ALA’s Global Scholars Program in July 2014, a unique international three-week entrepreneurial leadership summer camp, and the top ten essays will be published on the ALA website.

Winners will be announced on African Youth Day, November 1, 2013.
Link to Website: http://www.africanleadershipacademy.org/news/ala-announces-international-youth-day-essay-competition

By: Faith Abiodun, Communications Associate
About African Leadership Academy

African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to transform Africa by developing a powerful network of entrepreneurial leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact. Each year, ALA brings together the most promising young leaders from all 54 African nations for a pre-university program in South Africa with a focus on leadership, entrepreneurship and African studies. ALA continues to cultivate these leaders throughout their lives, in university and beyond, by providing ongoing leadership and entrepreneurial training and connecting them to high-impact networks of people and capital that can catalyse large-scale change. For more information, visit www.africanleadershipacademy.org.
Should you write an article using this press release, African Leadership Academy would like to archive and share the article. Please email any articles to iyd@africanleadershipacademy.org