Attend a Free Networking Forum in Accra

 BarCamp Accra 2014 is a free networking forum where participants learn, share and network. This 42nd Barcamp in Ghana takes place on December 20, 2014 at the Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology in East Legon, Accra. The theme is ‘Expanding Excellent Entreprises’. This is part of the Barcamp Ghana program run by the GhanaThink Foundation (now 10 years old), building a network of change makers, doers and Banner for event pageentrepreneurs.

Over the last 6 years since Barcamps in Ghana started, we’ve championed businesses ‘starting up’. We now have many young Ghanaian businesses. Now, we need to see these grow. We’ll be discussing great Ghanaian entreprise examples. Come learn from, share and network with various young professionals and students. Some of our confirmed resource personnel include Bridget Otoo (TV3), Nana Yaw Asiedu (Oxford & Beaumont), Rosy Fynn (Surfline), Anima Misa (Sapphire), Alex Bram (SMS GH), Christabel Dadzie (Optimal Solutions), Selorm Branttie (mPedigree), Anita Erskine (Viasat1), etc

Register at Barcamp Accra Eventbrite site.   You can also register by sending “Barcamp Accra Your Name Your Email Address” to 1945 on all mobile networks.(example – Barcamp Accra Esi Eshun esi@eshun.co) .  Contact us via barcamp at www.ghanathink.org for sponsorship or partnership opportunities. Our hashtag is #bcaccra.

Barcamp Accra 2014 is supported by Making All Voices Count, Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology,mPedigree GoldKeys, Saazaa Shoes, Nandimobile. Our media partners areSpy Ghana, YFM, XFM and Citi FM.

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15 Steps To Moderating a Twitter Chat

Jemila -  Twitter chat moderator expert reading through her tweets.

Jemila – Twitter chat moderator expert reading through her tweets.

 

 

Tweet Chats (Twitter Chats) are real time/live conversations held on issues of interest. They are opportunities to engage and converse with other Twitter users on relatable topics. Of course, they are held on Twitter!  Here are 15 things to consider when moderating a Twitter Chat:

  1. Purpose of the chat: Ask yourself what you want to achieve with the chat and what you want participants to learn from the chat.
  2. Develop and create engaging questions or topic: The main topic for the chat/debate should sound interesting for people to join the chat. Ask “How” and “Why” questions and not “Can” questions. The former allows for more contribution from participants while the latter restricts people to either agree or disagree with the topic. In the case of Twitter debates, “Can” questions are employed, but are typically followed up with “Why” for further elaboration by participants.
  3. Read widely about the topic: As a moderator of the Twitter chat/debate, you should have a good grasp on the issues in order to guide the conversation. Read widely on the topic to be discussed, focusing especially on the questions that will steer the conversation. That said, you don’t have to be an expert on the topic – instead, include one or two experts on the panel and direct complex questions to them for further insight. Do not leave any major stone unturned. Some participants are experts in the topic so you need to prepare well.
  4. Create a simple, but catchy hashtag: A tweet is composed of 140 characters. A long hashtag will limit how much can be said per tweet. Make sure the hashtag reflects the topic and is easy to remember. Do not use a long hashtag, remember your participants have only 140 characters to use.  Create a hashtag that speaks about the topic and can easily attract the attention of non-participants
  5. Time zones: Choose your time very well. Pay attention to the time zone of your audience and availability of guests (if any). State the time clearly when promoting the chat.
  6. Promote the chat! Tweet at potential participants: Use the Twitter search feature to search for the hashtag and the topic you are about to discuss. Identify and send tweet invites to specific Twitter handles regarding the upcoming chat. Send out periodic reminders about the chat – a day or two before the chat – state the topic, hashtag, time and guests (if any). Reach out to organisations and networks with an interest in the topic and request that they share with their members. A day or two to the chat day Let people know and understand what it’s all about – Promote the chat days before and consistently remind people about it.

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During the Twitter Chat

  1. Start on time: Start at the stated time. Welcome all (don’t forget to mention them, that’s some rapport building), make room for selected participants to introduce themselves and introduce guests (if any) to the audience. Let your audience know if you are running late and use the opportunity to find out who is tuning in and where from.
  2. Ask the first question: Do not ask the main question now, tweet the sub-question as your first question. Example, if the main question is “How can we create jobs?” the first question should be “Why are there not enough jobs in the market?” The idea is to get people more engaged before the main topic so you can make good use of the time and discuss the topic broadly.
  3. Tweet at participants: When asking questions, mention participants’ Twitter handles. It makes them feel part of the conversation and not left out. See if everyone is tweeting and then tweet at the silent tweeps. Monitor both the event hashtag and the account you are tweeting from to ensure you don’t miss anyone.
  4. Don’t just ask questions, Interact!: Allow people to share their thoughts on each question you ask before tweeting the next question. Engage with the audience, join in the conversation. If you are tweeting from your personal account, share your own thoughts. If you are tweeting from an organizational/company account, tweet about overlaps or linkages from that perspective. Let the conversation flow, quote and retweet participants. You can allow people to comment for about 5-10mins before you ask the next question.
  5. Be in control: You are the moderator so be in charge of the conversation. Some participants are likely to divert the discussion. You will need to direct the conversation so such participants don’t distract others. You can do this by tweeting at specific handles and asking them if they agree with a particular tweet by another participant.
  6. Reiterate and Ask follow-up questions: Read the discussion and look out for some questions that can be generated from the tweets from participants. Where necessary, recap key points to ensure everyone is on the same page. It also helps in clarifying submissions.
  7. Retweet as much as possible: Use the search feature on Twitter or Twitter fall to track the participants using the hashtag so you can retweet them, which is a sign that you are reading their tweets. That said, don’t be repetitive with the retweets – be mindful of the 100 tweets per hour/1000 tweets per day limit. Twitter jail looms. Have a backup account for takeover if necessary.
  8. Manage time: As moderator, it is your duty to manage time and ensure that the key aim(s) of the chat are achieved in the allocated time. It’s easy to get carried away, especially with an interactive chat. Close on time and keep participants in high expectation for the next Twitter chat.
  9. Express gratitude to participants, guests and event organisers: Leave on a high note. Say thank you to all who made the chat possible and interesting!

Post Chat

Document the chat: You can use storify to document the chat or submit it to Global Voices Online for publication. Share the storify article with your audience for those who missed the    chat.

Evaluate the conversation: Assess the whole conversation to find out if the right message was communicated or if the intended purpose for holding the chat was achieved.

 

This post was written by :

Cecil Kwamena Ato Dadzie (@GhanabaKwamena), social media strategist, blogger and Youth Development Advocate.

Kofi Yeboah (@Kofiemeritus), social media strategist, blogger and Communications Officer for Clean Team Ghana – an organisation that provides innovative and portable toilet facilities to the urban .

Thank you to our editor Jemila Abdulai (@JAbdulai)  – Founder of Circumspect.

 

 

$20,000 Golden Baobab Prizes Call for Submissions

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The 2014 Golden Baobab Prizes have been launched and are calling for submissions. This year, Golden Baobab will award 6 prizes worth $20,000. These 6 prizes are:

  • The $5,000 Golden Baobab Prize for Picture Book
  • The $5,000 Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Book
  • The $2,500 Golden Baobab Prize for Rising Writers
  • The $5,000 Golden Baobab Prize for Illustrators
  • The $2,500 Golden Baobab Prize for Rising Illustrators
  • The Golden Baobab Lifetime Achievement in Children’s Literature Award

This year marks the 6th anniversary of the 3 Golden Baobab Prizes for Literature. These prizes invite entries of unpublished stories for children written by African citizens irrespective of age, race, or country of origin.  In November 2013, Golden Baobab launched the fourth and fifth prizes, The Golden Baobab Prizes for Illustrations, to do for African illustrators what the organization has been doing for African writers for the past 5 years: discovering, nurturing and celebrating their talent, passion and contribution to the African children’s literature space. Entrants will submit illustrations as per Golden Baobab specifications.

The newest addition, The Golden Baobab Lifetime Achievement in Children’s Literature Award, which is the 6th prize, has been set up to recognize African writers/illustrators who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding significance to the development of African children’s literature. At the appropriate time, Golden Baobab will communicate how this prize will be run.

Last year, the three Golden Baobab Prizes for literature received 180 submissions from 13 African countries. This year, the coordinator of the Prizes, Nanama B. Acheampong, is confident that these numbers will improve: “We expect to receive many more submissions for the 2014 Golden Baobab Prizes for Literature this year. We have also had such positive reactions to our newly launched Golden Baobab Prizes for Illustrations and are looking forward to being pleasantly surprised.”

The 2013 winners were Liza Esterhuyse from South Africa who won the Golden Baobab Prize for Picture Book, Karen Hurt, also from South Africa, who won the Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Book and twelve year old Kanengo Rebecca Diallo from Tanzania who won the Golden Baobab Prize for Rising Writers which awards promising writers below the age of eighteen.

Entry information for the prizes can be found on the organization’s websitewww.goldenbaobab.org. Entrants should note that the copyright of each entry submitted to the Golden Baobab Prizes remains vested in them. However, by submitting an entry, entrants declare that they are legally entitled to do so and give Golden Baobab permission to make their entry available for exclusive worldwide royalty-free usage, reproduction and distribution. The deadline for the 2014 prizes is June 29th. Winners will be announced in November 2014.

For information on how to enter the 2014 Golden Baobab Prizes, visit Golden Baobab’s website or contact the coordinator, Nanama B. Acheampong at info@goldenbaobab.org.

The Essence of Personal Branding in the Social Media Era

The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding

The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding

 

Does personal branding really matter? This is it: whether you are a job seeker or entrepreneur, your personal brand and online presence has immense effect on you. A recent survey by Jobvite stated that more and more recruiters are turning to social media to aid them in their job recruitment, and that an individual’s online presence is one great determinant for securing a job.

“Candidates best watch what they put on their social profiles, as an overwhelming majority of recruiters form negative opinions from posts flaunting drugs, alcohol, and profanity—and 42% of recruiters have apparently reconsidered an applicant (either positively or negatively) based on what a social profile revealed.” ~ Jobvite

The shocking revelations, confirms lots of the point and concerns raised in the book. The simple guide helps readers, to use the Four D’s (4 D’s) and Four P’s (4 P’s) to build their personal brand. Let’s take a quick overview:

 

DiscoveryPersonal Discovery ~ Purpose.

Development – Working on your talents ~ Preparation.

DesignPlatform building, Career and work life ~ Positioning

DeploymentService and execution ~ Publicity, Promotion

The goal is to build a brand base on authenticity, value creation and service. Here again, according to the bayt.com report, about 9 out of 10 search for people’s profiles online after they have applied for a job or about to meet in person either for business or the activities. It’s proves that personal branding and having an online presence is really important in this age, and that it can either work for or against you. From the report it stated that, “In fact, even something as simple as a photograph could influence decision-makers, with eight in 10 (79.6%) respondents of the belief that their online photo effects how they are perceived.” The crust of the matter is that these polls were not conducted anywhere than East and North Africa. It’s now time to take your personal brand seriously. Don’t be left out.

This is what an international Best seller had to say concerning the book:

“With the speed of changes in the world today, success has no geographical borders. In this engaging book, Bernard Kelvin Clive shares principles from his own success in Ghana that can inspire and guide readers anywhere in the world. With a gentle and humble spirit, he reminds us that building a name for ourselves is most easily done not by manipulating and pushing but simply by serving others. I highly recommend The No Nonsense Guide to Personal Branding for anyone who has a voice to be heard.” Dan Miller, author of New York Times bestselling 48 Days to the Work You Love.

Remember: It’s time to make your career and brand count. “#SocialMedia can get you the attention you want but not the trust you need. You got to build trust. #PersonalBranding” ~ If you are interested in learning how to position yourself properly online, a copy of the book “The No Nonsense Guide to personal Branding for Career Success”

Your brand matters.

Author: Bernard Kelvin Clive | Amazon Bestelling Author | #1 Self-Help Podcast Host in Ghana

3 LESSONS I LEARNT FROM MY 3 BUDDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY.

Its 12:10am local time in Ghana. I am still awake reflecting on the moments I had in the university with my THREE friends. The hustle and struggle we had to pass through to even get graduated “unofficially” (waiting for actual graduation in mid-September, 2013) at the university. One thing that kept me going is the friends I had at the university and how these guys motivated me to stay focused and live a balanced life. Let me briefly share with you THREE lessons I learnt from my good THREE friends, I call them coaches.

 

Frank Kweku Bandoh

Frank Kweku Bandoh

Frank Kweku Bandoh was my schoolmate at the high school and sat with him in the same class during high school moments. Abeiku (a Ghanaian name for males born on Wednesday) as we normally call him started his small and phone repairing business right from high school. We use to call him “businessman. At the university we became very good friends in sharing ideas and how to execute them. He advanced from phone repairing phones to printing and stationery business where he employed someone to take care of it. He later bought a car and used it as a taxi and generated enough to buy his current car which he is using as a taxi (cab). I used to ask him a lot of questions as to how he was able to start all these small businesses at his age. He will never respond to any of my questions and will tell me to start something. I took his advice and started a small business on campus with him where we use to sell liquid bathing soap to students. That is when I learnt a lot from him. If there is one thing I learnt from this guy, it will be his ability to create a business concept out of anything he comes into contact with.

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Richmond Elipklim

Richmond Elipklim is the fashionista among the three friends. As much as he is interested in stock exchange and anything related to investment, he is so particular about what we wear and how we wear them. Richmond would occasionally buy clothing that he thinks is good for us to wear to meet the current fashion standard. He used to say “Kofi, what you are wearing is too big, you need to change it”. He made us so conscious of what we we should wear to the extent that, I needed to consult him before buying any shoe or clothing. Trust Richmond to dress well for any occasion, you will easily notice his presence with his gentle style of dressing. I learnt to spend money on what is important and not just anything. I have become so conscious of my dressing up till now. He taught me that, dressing speaks a lot about your self image and that one can create a personal brand through the way he/she dresses. He is was also my schoolmate at high school and sat in the same class with him.

Bismark with his guitar.

Bismark with his guitar.

Bismark Hayford is the gentle man among the three friends. We call him “Pastor Bismark”, he is fast to draw us back to God when we seem to be veering of the path of our relationship with God. He is a lover of music and he unconsciously taught me how to sing and trained my voice as well. Bismark is the quiet person among us, kind of an introvert. His enormous ability to absorb our craziness is one spectacular principle I learnt from him. He is a good listener and extremely patient, he does not respond to situations as fast as we would but will gently think through before he takes an action.

I learnt from him how to be patient and hold on tight to my dreams and ambitions even though I might not see any sign of it actualising.

 

 

 

We use to discuss how we can escape this unproductive educational system in Ghana and what to make use of our leisure time. We would share ideas ranging from marriage to career during our meet-ups. Our time in the evenings were mostly based on business ideas. Thank you guys for impacting my life, I owe your kids a lot.

PRESS RELEASE: Barcamp Cape Coast 2013

bccapecoast

Barcamp Cape Coast 2013 is a free networking forum bringing people together for a day of discussion, demos and dialogue on Cape Coast, Ghana and beyond. It will take place on September 14, 2013 at the Faculty of Education lecture Theatre 9 at the University of Cape Coast. The theme for this year is Solving unemployment by creating work. This Barcamp hopes to assemble stakeholders to network, build a supportive enterprising community and partner to build together.

The GhanaThink Foundation has successfully organized 22 BarCamps in Ghana. BarCamp Cape Coast 2013 will focus on how Ghana’s youth can solve the unemployment issue by creating work for themselves and others. There might be a shortage of jobs, but there’s no shortage of work. It will be an insightful, informational and inspirational event that young people in and around Cape Coast should not miss.

The Barcamp will feature multiple user-generated breakout sessions about business, social entrepreneurship, technology and development, alongside topics relevant to the Central Region and beyond. There will be a speed mentoring session where mentors will give insights and answers to questions from attendees. Some of the confirmed resource personnel include Frank Ekow Williams, Ann Agyare-Amponsah, Patrick Ekow Acquah, Joseph Hudson, CareerCoach Emmanuel Woyome, David K Egyir, Edem Adazho, amongst others.

Register/RSVP at the BarCamp Cape Coast eventbrite website (barcampcapecoast13.eventbrite.com) or text “Barcamp Cape Coast [name] [email address] to 1945 through any mobile network. You may also contact the BarCamp Cape Coast team through the eventbrite page for sponsorship opportunities. If you are interested in organizing a breakout session, let us know, especially if you have special needs.

BarCamp Cape Coast 2013 is sponsored by GhanaThink Foundation , Google Ghana, Kiss Condoms, Nandimobile , ThisWeekinUCC, etc. Our media partners are the Spy Ghana and ATL FM. Join us to move the Central Region and Ghana forward.

“SUCCESS IN 9 TWEETS BY DERRICK ASHONG”

Donald Ward, President of iROKKO CONCEPTS tweeted on his timeline asking his followers to name one Young African Entrepreneur they would like to meet and If they do meet that person, what question would you ask?

I responded to the tweet and said that I would like to meet Derrick Ashong:

photo credit: Ridwan Adami for Ridz Design

photo credit: Ridwan Adami for Ridz Design

 

 

Derrick Ashong is An experienced musician, broadcaster and digital media influencer, he has carved out a unique niche as an expert in bridging the gap between old and new media. He has been invited to speak & perform at prestigious institutions including Harvard Business School, Wharton, MIT & Stanford, and has hosted and moderated events for influencers and heads of state including Nobel Laureates Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, as well as Gilberto Gil, Ted Turner, Tommy Hilfiger, Bob Geldof, Queen Rania of Jordan, and former President Bill Clinton at the Club de Madrid. His interviews have ranged from celebrities like John Legend, Jimmi Cliff and supermodel Alek Wek, to environmentalist Jane Goodall, senior advisor to President Obama David Axelrod, Governor Jeb Bush and former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

 

In response to my tweet, Derrick pointed out nine key principles that guides his life. Enjoy the tweets.

Thank you for reading this post send me your comments through emeritus2011@gmail.com.

“THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR YOUNG AFRICAN ENTREPRENEURS” – THE $75,000 ANZISHA PRIZE ANNOUNCES ITS 2013 FINALISTS.

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DUBBED “THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR YOUNG AFRICAN ENTREPRENEURS” – THE $75,000 ANZISHA PRIZE ANNOUNCES ITS 2013 FINALISTS

Twelve inspirational entrepreneurs from around Africa are the finalists for the prestigious Anzisha Prize, Africa’s foremost youth entrepreneurship award. The contenders, who hail from 10 countries on the continent, stand a chance to share in over $75 000 USD in cash prizes and receive networking and learning opportunities, which is provided through a partnership between African Leadership Academy and by The MasterCard Foundation.

The Anzisha Prize identifies and celebrates Africa’s young entrepreneurial leaders between the ages of 15 to 22, who have addressed challenges in their communities and launched innovative ventures. This year these range from renewable energy projects and technology solutions to agriculture and education.

For the first time in the prize’s history, South Africa has two finalists. Kolawole Olajide, 21, is the chief developer and co-founder of Funda, an award-winning online learning management system. Neftaly Malatjie, 22, has been running Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP) for more than eight years since he founded it at the age of 14. DYP is an NGO that focuses on income generating programmes that enable young people to engage in business opportunities.

Uganda also boasts two finalists. Best Ayiorworth, 19, has empowered over 200 young women in her home district through her microfinance lending programme while Titus Mawano’s vision to get African SMMEs “in the cloud” inspired him to develop Ffene, a business management platform.

Says Chi Achebe, Anzisha Prize programme manager: “There are thousands of entrepreneurial African youth who are making a difference in their communities every day. We are honoured to be able to share a subset of their stories with the world and enable them to take their businesses to the next level.  These are the African business leaders of the future and our goal is to help support their growth.”

“The Anzisha Prize illustrates the potential, ingenuity and entrepreneurial energy of young people across Africa,” said Reeta Roy, President and CEO of The MasterCard Foundation. “Each year, the Anzisha Prize finalists encourage young people from across the continent to pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions and make a difference in their communities.”

All 12 finalists will take part in the 2013 Anzisha Prize Finalist Week which takes place from Sunday, August 25, to Friday, August 30. While there, they will be taught by the African Leadership Academy’s renowned Entrepreneurial Leadership faculty as well as members of the South African Chapter of Entrepreneurs Organisation.

The grand prize winner will be announced at a gala function to be held in Johannesburg, South Africa, on the evening of August 30. . As part of the MasterCard Foundation’s partnership with African Leadership Academ (ALA),  winners will share $75,000 USD courtesy of The MasterCard Foundation and will join the esteemed Anzisha Fellows network, composed of the 20 Anzisha Fellows to date. The winners will also be given networking and learning opportunities to take their projects to the next level.

Now in its third year, the Anzisha Prize, celebrates the initiative and innovation of youth in Africa. It identifies exceptional young entrepreneurs who are leading by example and underscores their ability to significantly shape the future of Africa.

The word ‘Anzisha’ is taken from Swahili and translates into ‘initiative’ and is a project that is gaining significant momentum in African business circles as its impact is beginning to be felt.

The 12 Anzisha 2013 finalists (in country order) are:

CAMEROON

David Morfaw

Project Title: Poult-Vault Inc.

Industry: Agriculture

Nineteen-year-old David Morfaw, from Bafut in Cameroon, has always had an entrepreneurial spirit and started his first business at the age of eight. His current venture is the poultry business Poult-Vault Inc. However, it is not simply about the bottom line but also helping the community he lives in – he currently employs six people. His business plan maximises each opportunity, whether it is selling chicks after three weeks, keeping them until they are grown at nine weeks or selling the chickens and their eggs. He also provides the waste produced to local farmers for fertile manure.

EGYPT

Khaled Shady

Project Title: Mubser

Industry: Information technology

Khaled Shady, from Shebin El-Kom, is a 21-year-old computer engineering student at Menoufoia University in Egypt. His university curriculum and technical knowledge gave him a unique opportunity to develop a system that could make a difference for the blind community. He decided to develop a cutting-edge product that could aid them in their daily lives. Shady’s invention Mubser is a wearable belt, fully equipped with Bluetooth and Microsoft Kinect, which allows the wearer to navigate safely around objects and obstacles using a system of vibrating motors. It is already making an impact and improving the quality of life for blind people.

KENYA

Barclay Okari

Project Title: Safi-pads

Industry: Consumer products

Paul Barclay is a 21-year-old entrepreneur from Kitale in Kenya. His business, Safi-pads, provides inexpensive, reusable and washable sanitary towels for women and young girls. Barclay saw that the prices of regular disposable towels were simply too expensive for families strapped for cash so he and his team developed a product that could help thousands of women while still turning a profit. Barclay has already sold more than 14 000 units of his sanitary towels and plans to expand when he can afford to pay for various mechanisms to make his production system more efficient. He currently employs 14 women but impacts so many families by providing an affordable option of a necessary hygiene product.

MALAWI

Gonjetso Chinyama

Project Title: Pakwathu

Industry: Information technology

Gonjetso Chinyama is a 21-year-old student at the University of Malawi in Blantyre where he is studying Management Information Systems with a passion for art, design, and computer programming. He joined these passions to start a creative design agency called Twenty2 Creative. From there he saw a niche in the marketplace and created the Internet real estate venture, Pakwathu. This online classifieds website enables Malawians to find property throughout the country and sift through a plethora of options based on location and price.

NIGERIA

Temitayo Olufuwa

Project Title: JobsinNigeria

Industry: Information technology

Temitayo Olufuwa, from Fadeyi, is a graduate of N.I.I.T. where he focused on computer science and software. The 21-year-old created JobsinNigeria (www.jobsinnigeria.com.ng), a web-based system that allows users to search, find and apply for new jobs at the click of the mouse or even on mobile devices. JobsinNigeria only started in 2012 and yet its impact on the Nigerian community is growing substantially with more than 200 Nigerians already finding jobs.

RWANDA

Joie Laurent Sangwa

Project Title: Domestic Biogas Use Promotion Project

Industry: Energy and waste

Nineteen-year-old Joie Sangwa from Burera in Rwanda realised that her community needed cheap and renewable energy resources. Working with a team, she discovered that human waste is a good source of energy and worked to install domestic biogas units throughout her home region. This offers a cheap, alternative energy source while helping with the environment.

SENEGAL

Donald Bambara

Project Title: Green Act

Industry: Energy and waste

Nineteen-year-old Donald Bambara grew up in Burkina Faso but after completing his high school education, moved to Dakar, Senegal, to start international management studies. Bambara quickly came to recognise a big problem in his university community – waste. He came up with a dynamic plan for how to combat the waste problem and started Green Act. This project helps separate trash from recyclable materials on campus. But his quest to clean up his campus, and campuses around him, doesn’t end there as he processes the recyclables into plastic pellets, funds cleaning services on campuses, and tries to educate students and young people in Senegal about the impact of current waste management practices and future possibilities for recycling.

SOUTH AFRICA

Neftaly Malatjie

Project Title: Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP)

Industry: Youth development and education

Neftaly Malatjie has a passion for social entrepreneurship and a track record of commitment to community work. Since the age of 11, he has worked as a preschool teacher, peer educator, library assistant, HIV/Aids counsellor, drugs awareness and prevention teacher, learning and development advisor and afternoon care coordinator. In 2005, at the age of 14, using cash he had saved from his part-time job, he started Diepsloot Youth Projects (DYP) to make an impact in the poverty stricken Diepsloot area. Diepsloot Youth Projects focuses on income generating programmes that enable young people to engage in business opportunities. It has created employment for 16 young people.

Kolawole Olajide

Project Title: Funda

Industry: Information technology and education

Kolawole Olajide, 21, is a native of Nigeria and schooled in Cape Town, South Africa. He is the chief developer and co-founder of Funda, an online learning management system that brings together educational resources to make the lives of teachers, students and parents easier. For example, a teacher can create a website that serves as an online discussion board for students to collaborate on an assignment while students can create a class website to work on and submit assignments electronically. He is part of a five man team of young entrepreneurs who represent five different African nations – Nigeria, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Kenya.  Olajide and his team have gone on to win a number of awards, recognition from prestigious groups like the UNDP and an invitation to attend the Davos World Economic Forum.

TANZANIA

Damotila Silayo 

Project Title: Jathropa Soap Production

Industry: Health and wellness

Domitila Silayo is a 21-year-old university student from Moshi, Tanzania. After visiting an agricultural festival, Silayo saw great potential for using the jathropa plant for cosmetic and medicinal uses. She began research on how to produce a soap made from the herbal plant that could heal a variety of skin problems including ringworm and dandruff. Jathropa Soap Production has gone on to help thousands of people in Tanzania fight off skin problems while still turning a healthy profit and creating employment.

UGANDA

Best Aiyorworth

Project Title: Girls’ Power Micro Lending Organisation

Industry: Microfinance and education

Best Aiyorworth is an advocate for education in her home district Nebbi in northern Uganda. The 21-year-old has started the Girls’ Power Micro Lending Organisation. Its motto is “To help a mother, is to help a girl child.” Girls’ Power is a micro lending business that supports girls through their mothers. They give women starting capital or money to boost their existing businesses so that they are able to support their daughters with school fees and scholastic materials and ensure that they get an education. She has empowered over 400 women to date.

Titus Mawano

Project Title: Ffene

Industry: Information technology

Titus Mawano, a 22-year-old from Kampala, is the brains behind Ffene, a business management platform for SMMEs in Africa who are struggling to stay organised, yet still use a loose-leaf notebook to keep record of clients and sales. Ffene’s vision is to get African businesses in the cloud. Whether it is accounting, inventory management or data keeping, Ffene is the one stop shop for a SMME’s accounting, customer and inventory management needs. With more than 400 current customers just three months after launch, Ffene is well on its way to revolutionising how SMMEs do business in Uganda and beyond.

Go to:

➢ Website: www.anzishaprize.org

➢ Facebook: www.facebook.com/anzishaprize

➢ Twitter: @anzishaprize

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

Addendum

 

South Africa’s Neftaly Malatjie was not originally listed when Anzisha announced its shortlist of 25 candidates. However, Malatjie replaced one of the semi-finalists who did not meet the awards’ criteria during the diligence process.

About the Anzisha Prize

 

The Anzisha Prize is managed out of African Leadership Academy’s Centre for Entrepreneurial Leadership, which was established through a multi-year partnership with The MasterCard Foundation. Through the Anzisha Prize, the organisers seek to catalyse innovation and entrepreneurship among youth across the continent.

About African Leadership Academy

 

African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to transform Africa by developing a powerful network of entrepreneurial leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact. Each year, ALA brings together the most promising young leaders from all 54 African nations for a pre-university program in South Africa with a focus on leadership, entrepreneurship and African studies. ALA continues to cultivate these leaders throughout their lives, in university and beyond, by providing on-going leadership and entrepreneurial training and connecting them to high-impact networks of people and capital that can catalyse large-scale change. For more information, visit http://africanleadershipacademy.org.

About The MasterCard Foundation

The MasterCard Foundation is an independent, global organization based in Toronto, Canada, with more than $6 billion in assets.  Through collaboration with partner organizations in 50 countries, it is creating opportunities for all people to learn and prosper.  The Foundation’s programs promote Financial Inclusion and advance Youth Learning, mostly in Africa.  Established in 2006 through the generosity of MasterCard Worldwide when it became a public company, the Foundation is separate and independent from the company.  Its policies, operations, and funding decisions are determined by its own Foundation Board of Directors and President and CEO.  To learn more about the Foundation, please visit www.mastercardfdn.org.

Press Contact:

Janine Walker janine.w@mweb.co.za or +27 83 600 9753

Faith Abiodun fabiodun@africanleadershipacademy.org or +27 78 644 2649

 

Should you write an article using this press release, African Leadership Academy would like to link to the article on its website. Please email any articles to janine.w@mweb.co.za and info@africanleadershipacademy.org

AFRICAN LEADERSHIP ACADEMY ANNOUNCES INTERNATIONAL YOUTH DAY ESSAY COMPETITION.

 

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African Leadership Academy (ALA) is very delighted to join the United Nations in recognizing the immense potential and celebrating the extraordinary achievements of young people around the world on International Youth Day, August 12, 2013.

International Youth Day (IYD), celebrated yearly on August 12, is a United Nations-designated day of observance established in 2000 to raise awareness of issues affecting young people around the world. It is also a day to recognize the efforts of the world’s youth in creating a global society, and aims to promote ways to engage them in being more actively involved in making positive contributions to their communities. The theme for International Youth Day 2013 is “Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward”

African Leadership Academy (ALA) is a leading pan-African institution that seeks to transform Africa by identifying, developing and connecting a powerful network of leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact on the continent. ALA believes that Africa will be developed by Africans, and in line with the theme for IYD 2013, promotes the retention of African talent in Africa, as well as the return of African talent to the continent from the diaspora.

In celebrating International Youth Day 2013, ALA focuses on the need to maximize the potential of African youth at home and abroad to contribute optimally to the development of the continent. Demographic studies show that Africa has the largest youth population in the world of over 200 million people, a figure which is expected to double by 2045.

The UN Economic Commission for Africa estimates that by 2015, over one-fourth of the world’s workforce will be African; conversely the huge vacuum of opportunities for the African youth makes the gainful employment of this young workforce extremely doubtful. In spite of the fact that six of the ten fastest growing economies in the world are in sub-Saharan Africa, unemployment rates across the continent hover around 70%, and the World Bank estimates that about 60% of all unemployed Africans are between the ages of 15 and 24. It is clearly evident therefore, that Africa’s great challenge is how to effectively utilize its youth bulge to drive the continent’s development.

Over time, the allure of securing quality education and improved economic opportunities has led to a prolonged exodus of many young Africans from the continent, resulting in an erroneous belief that the best opportunities in life are outside Africa. However, the vast majority of the African youth reside in the continent, and engage in endless pursuits of economic opportunities. There is an urgent need for concerted efforts by governments, businesses, non-profits and all Africans to create an enabling environment for the African youth to gain access to the resources, skills and networks that will enable them to contribute effectively to African development.

As part of ALA’s ongoing efforts to actively engage the African youth in the development of the continent, the Academy hereby announces the first edition of the International Youth Day Essay Writing Competition open to young Africans between the ages of 15-19 years. Between August 12 and September 12, 2013, young Africans are challenged to write on the topic: “How can governments, businesses, non-profits, individuals and the youth collaborate to maximize Africa’s youth potential for the continent’s development and prosperity?” The writers of the best three essays will be awarded scholarships to attend ALA’s Global Scholars Program in July 2014, a unique international three-week entrepreneurial leadership summer camp, and the top ten essays will be published on the ALA website.

Winners will be announced on African Youth Day, November 1, 2013.
Link to Website: http://www.africanleadershipacademy.org/news/ala-announces-international-youth-day-essay-competition

By: Faith Abiodun, Communications Associate
About African Leadership Academy

African Leadership Academy (ALA) seeks to transform Africa by developing a powerful network of entrepreneurial leaders who will work together to achieve extraordinary social impact. Each year, ALA brings together the most promising young leaders from all 54 African nations for a pre-university program in South Africa with a focus on leadership, entrepreneurship and African studies. ALA continues to cultivate these leaders throughout their lives, in university and beyond, by providing ongoing leadership and entrepreneurial training and connecting them to high-impact networks of people and capital that can catalyse large-scale change. For more information, visit www.africanleadershipacademy.org.
Should you write an article using this press release, African Leadership Academy would like to archive and share the article. Please email any articles to iyd@africanleadershipacademy.org

10 UNDER 35 CHANGEMAKERS IN KENYA YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Kenya has got a lot of young change makers who are hardly seen in the national media . During my two months visit to the beautiful city of Nairobi, Kenya I happen to meet some of these young people and I was amazed to hear their stories and the impact they are making in Kenya. Most of them run their own non-profit organisations that focus on gender equity, philanthropy, human right activism, child right protection, entrepreneurship etc. This blogpost is to share what they do and the impact they are making through their various organisations. Enjoy the read!

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Naomi N. Mwaura, a gender activist is the  founder of FloNe Initiative, an organization that promotes social reforms in Africa in order to increase self –reliance and informed choices among African men and women because of the value and potential the organisation sees in our continent. Within this component, the focus will be on three thematic areas: gender equality, education, and sexual and reproductive health. Their vision is to achieve a sustainable improved quality of life for people in Africa. The organisation carries out it’s vision through: Community participation, school participation, gender equity  and sustainability. Naomi was nominated as the “Opportunity Desk-Young Person of the Month (November, 2013). Read her feature article on: Tiny Frame with Giant Marks (Insert below link}  I met Naomi in Nairobi during my educational visit to Kenya and had an opportunity to talk with her about her work and the impact it is making in Kenya. She was introduced to me by Kwabena Mavin Daniels.

 

 

 

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Wiclif Otieno is the founder and CEO of Kito International, a non-profit social enterprise with a simple philosophy: give street youth an economic opportunity, and they will WORK their way off the streets and out of poverty. Kito was started by Wiclif (a former street boy) and focuses on youth between the ages of 15 and 24 by creating sustainable entrepreneurship and employment opportunities for street youth. Kito International hopes to assure that rehabilitated street youth can achieve success. Kito’s goal is to help street youth become productive and contributing world citizens. Kito helps street youth to find employment and attain self-sufficiency by strengthening youth capacity and employability as well as developing entrepreneurial and employment opportunities. The training provided to youth includes life skills training, enterprise skills training, computer skills training and leadership seminars and workshops.  Wiclif was a tedx speaker at TEDxSanJoaquin. I met Wiclif at the iHub in Nairobi during One Acre fund Social Entrepreneurship happy hour where he shared the work he is doing. He was introduced to me by Spencer Ton

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Evans Muriu is the founder and CEO of Kuna Vijana, a non profit making organization that seeks to earn Kenyan youth a name and a reputation by fully tapping, utilizing and exposing talent. A youth initiative with a difference that seeks to change the image the society has towards the youth. It intends to make youth of Kenya a resourceful people in the society and to be able to positively use their interpersonal skills, knowledge and talents to improve the society. The members of Kuna Vijana will be exposed to a variety of opportunities in learning, life skills development, volunteer-ship in order to acquire work experience, leadership qualities development, counseling and support through connections with mentors. Kuna Vijana aspires to be the Kenya’s most comprehensive and successful youth organization by ensuring the youth overcome significant barriers to success which they are facing in the society today and which curtail them in realizing their full potential. Evans Muriu is an Entrepreneur, Business Consultant, Analyst, operations manager for Africa Gathering, Kenya and a philanthropist. Evans was recommended to me by Marieme Jamme.

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David Kimani, founder of Dagoretti Youth Development Group, this is a focused youth group which is up to changing the community. The vision is to  create a world where youth realize their full potential through talents and also the use of drama to create awareness in Dagoretti community, Nairobi Kenya and beyond through partnerships with organization of similar objectives, the main agenda is to nurture the vulnerable youth in schools and out of school and encourage them to take their talents seriously. David was recently featured on Safari Africa TV debut programme dubbed “Youth Outlook” in Nairobi, Kenya. I was privileged to interview David and visit his organisation in Kenya and see what they do in the community.

 

 

1004456_10151461514277271_1214790958_nRaphael is the convener/founder of The Youth Congress, a vibrant youth led initiative in Kenya that provide mostly young men and women in the urban slums and other informal settlements with a platform to enhance youth leadership and meaningful participation in socio-economic and political processes for improvement of their livelihoods and that of their community members at large. He is also the founder of  Miss Koch Initiative, Koch FM Community radioNacka-Nairobi and K-Youth Media.  Raphael is a strategic advisor and a member of key youth organizations and organizations working on youth related issues at the local, national and International fora. Noteworthy, he was instrumental in the process that resulted to amongst others the national Youth Policy and the National Youth Council Act in Kenya. He has been involved at different levels with youth initiatives in Africa, Europe, Asia, North and South America. I was privileged to have a day out with Raphael as he spoke to me about his work and the assistance he is offering the Kenyan youth. He was introduced to me by Chris Ammon.  SOURCE: http://www.unhabitat.org

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Peggy Mativo is the founder of PACE (Promoting Access to Community Education) and the PanAfrican Scholars Program, both which engage passionate youthful volunteers in expanding educational access to African students. PACE is inspired by the vision that one day all Kenyan children will have access to quality education. To tackle the biting teacher shortage in the country, PACE applies a unique strategy where they recruit Kenya’s most promising high school graduates and engage them in all endeavors. After selecting the graduates, they train them as teaching assistants then deploy and support them through the entire period, they work in under-resourced schools. She is a 3rd year student at Harvard University majoring in Chemistry and East Asian Studies. She worked as a Mentor and tutor in the Harvard-Alston Educational Portal, a Campus Ambassador with Teach for China. Peggy recently won the Clinton Global Initiative University Commitment of the Year Award and is an affiliate of the Harambe Entrepreneurial Alliance. I met her through social media and read about the work she is doing.

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Tracey kadada is involved in community work and is the founder of a community based organisation called Entertaining Angels Together. It started as a sport team called the Kenya Redsox Baseball team, it was meant to bring the youths and teenagers to have a relationship with Jesus Christ which has been successful in bringing 200 youths to Christ and teenagers,the organisation has been able to provide feeding programs for the street boys and girls and we have successfully sheltered 20 street kids ,who also play baseball, they have won twice in the provincial zone, they go to school and are doing exploits. They also make beads for a living and they are also great artists. I met her during my educational trip in Kenya.
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Nivi Mukherjee is the co-founder and CEO of eLimu. As a social entrepreneur, technophile and community volunteer, she is passionate about empowering youth and engaging in community initiatives that foster development and fun. She was the Education Quality Assurance Manager at the Institute of Software Technologies, an IT training company based in Nairobi. She also runs Maisha ni Matamu, a “funucational” social project that aims to bring a day full of joy every month to children who are underprivileged and/or orphaned. In her spare time, Nivi organizes cultural festivals, bakes, knits, runs half marathons, folds origami and plays Fußball. As a child, her favourite toy was the Speak & Spell. She was recommended by Ato Ulzen Appiah. SOURCE: http://e-limu.org

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Shikoh Gitau is the First African to receive a Google Award, a computer scientist with a heart, and over 8 years experience in ICT4D. Shikoh is the project founder of Ummeli is a mobile jobs and community portal hosted by Vodafone Live and accessible through Young Africa Live. The emphasis is on a community where young Africans can support each other in the development of their careers, share ideas, act as connectors or even just be a sounding board when things seem hopeless. She is a firm believer in human potential and loves looking at how technology can be an enabler to the development of marginalized, and often dismissed members of our society. She was recommended by Ato Ulzen Appiah.

 

 

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Evans Wadongo, he grew up in Kenya, he strained to read by the dim light of a kerosene lantern. Now he’s making solar-charged lanterns and using them to spur economic development.  His use of kerosene lamps during evening study eventually inspired him to create MwangaBora(Swahili for Good Light) in 2004. Through his organization, Sustainable Development For All (SDFA), Evans has distributed thousands of solar lamps to villages across Kenya and other African countries, and helped hundreds of women groups set up projects using money they would otherwise have spent on kerosene. I have not personally interacted with  Evans, but his recent inclusion in the list of “35 under 35 innovators in the world” inspired me to add to this post.

There are many other youth who running amazing projects in Kenya and so proud of them as well. I will be coming up with “10 under 35 Changemakers in Ghana You Need To Know” 

NB: Send me your comments or suggestions to this post through my email: emeritus2011@gmail.com